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." the show is in its second season. we are glad you joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every daywe know that we are only halfwaywalmart committed $2 billion toas we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers likethank you. tavis: please welcome laura dern by on this program. the oscar nominees is enjoying great success on her series called "enlightened." here is a scene from "enlightened." >> where have you been for two days? >> i was in la. >> and? >> i do not want to talk to you about this kind of stuff. it would be great if you were happy for me, but it never works out that way. >> happy for what now? >> things are going to change for the better, so when the time is right. >> you have a new boyfriend or what? >> it is more than that. the bigger liar i dream about. be happy, mom. that is all i need from you. tavis: all right, then. how cool is that? >> it was cool getting to work with my mom. tavis: it really is mom. since you wer
a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: phil jackson quit after learning -- earning 11 rings. practicallyt stop every team in the league from pursuing him to come back. coach, no questions about your comeback. that decision may be forthcoming, we shall see. he spends a lot of time in montana where he writes books, detailing his philosophy about winning and losing. "11 rings, the soul of success." i really love the subtitle. >> everything pales behind winning. make a big statement, the losses to detroit and to boston were real moments that were tough to get by. player, we lost to the lakers and 71, 72. we were able to win 72 and 73 against the laker team. tavis: if one can get addicted to winning, what is the antidote for that? it is an addiction like anything else, you see where i am going with this. what do you do about that? if you lose, it is a deep thought. it was the innovator of the triangle offense. players ofed
. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their it worked hard to understand the industry you are operate in. key provide capital for strategic decisions. we offer tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? and now, "bbc world news america." president obama announced his government surveillance program and assesses this deteriorating relationship with russia. >> we're doing things that are good for the united states and hopefully good for russia as well. but recognizing there are going to be some differences. we will not be able to completely disguise them. >> hiding in plain sight. this sicilian mafia boss was living in italy for decades. italy wants him back to serve his time. it is summer. it must be time for that vacation souvenir. we will trace how the trinkets have become big business. onwelcome to our viewers public television in america and around the globe. today president obama held a wide ranging press conference at the white house on the eve of leaving for his summer vacation. on the agenda was announcing new oversight and transparenc
to settle. you joined us. athe legacy of martin luther king is coming up now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. tavis: we are joined by the director of the king institute. i guess today officially concludes the festivities that have been going on for weeks. what is your sense for how martin has been treated? >> i think it has been great. i think that represents that martin luther king's legacy lives on into the 21st century. >> we have a problem where the majority do not have passports. not get out and see the world. see inside looking out. when one does travel around the world, give me some sense of how is regardedr king around the world. >> you have asked the right question. he is a world figure. he is a symbol for social justice around the world. outsidein a similar way the united states martin luther as ais viewed not just black leader. they recognize he is a symbol for human rights, social justice, and everyone is familiar with i have a dream. they see his dream as symbolic of their own dreams. >> i am not naÏve asking this. resonatednd why it be
have joined us. coming up, right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had. he said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. cane work together, we stamp hunger out. yourd by contributions to pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: stephen stills' 50-year career has taken him on a formidable solo career and has been written in red the finding and comes, like "for what it's worth. " a four cd set called "carry on," curated by graham nash. here he is singing the song he wrote, suite judy blue eyes. -- sweet judy blue eyes. ♪ ♪ ♪ tavis: when you look at this box set, you think what about these five decades? >> i focus on what has come next. , we call that i did ourselves the ride. .e have nice elderly rides it's all about the band, name the band. which i hadn't played in many years. buffalo springfield was hard enough. >> we go over
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. inc. you. thank you. >> joining us now to kick off these three nights of this historicon anniversary is the author of "the king years." fromr branch joins us washington. it is good to have you back on the program. >> i have been. talking and getting the message out. let me start with the obvious questions. how does the march on washington ?it into this narrative >> it comes in 1963, when the sees politicsly by the throat because of the demonstrations in birmingham earlier that spring culminating ofthe citizens -- sit in previous years. it led them to call for of march , so 63 was the year of the big rig through to put the civil rights movement at the forefront of american politics. i mentioned a factoid, the notion president kennedy did everything he could to convince that march.have >> he was right to propose the almostights bill was suicidal because democrats had depended on the solid south, and the solid south depended on segregation. innedy was putting all that jeopardy. he was very reluctant. >> what about the fact that the have
are limiting the requirement to retreat. use deadly force. >> 16 states currently have stand your ground law on the books. in maryland, individuals have a duty to retreat before considering and using deadly force. that could change of baltimore county republican delegate patrick madonna has his way. >> we are introducing legislation to create a stand your ground law in maryland, the strongest form of protection for crime victims and potential crime victims. >> it provides an exemption to the duty to retreat. stand your ground states have exemptions as well. kansas, this defense cannot be used during the commission of a crime. in north carolina, it cannot be used in circumstances that involve law enforcement or landlord disputes. >> when you have duty to retreat, a victim can be subject to a civil lawsuit or from a prosecution. >> a law signed by martin o'malley in 2010 provide civil immunity from damages when force or deadly force is used under reasonable circumstances. according to an analysis by the 10th of a times, florida's stand your ground law has allowed drug dealers to avoid murder c
>> he was flop with drunk driving charges. david collins joins us live with the latest. >> there is strong reactions coming from members of the wires yer's party. calls for him to resign from his seat are increasing and growing louder. >> he could should consider resigning from the legislator and get the help that he needs to get back on track. >> democrats stop short of calling for him to step down. >> he needs to look within himself in terms of what is best for his constituents. him earlyarrested tuesday morning for dui. police charging documents say that an officer transporting a prisoner spotted a cadillac with delegates tags driving erratically. police say he performed poorly tests.e field sobriety he had a strong odor about call on his breath. he told officers he had a couple of beers at a tavern. he refused a breathalyzer test. he faces an uncertain future as a state revisited. many of his constituents wanted to resign. >> he should resign. how is our role model? >> no one answered the door at his home. he has not returned calls placed to a cell phone or office.
is announcing plans to run against him. david collins joins us live from glen burnie with more. hour, lifelong has been a resident gus kurtz is announcing his plans to take dwyer's seat. gus kurtz is already a household name. the developer and committee act of his believes he is qualified to defeat delegate don dwyer and shake things up in annapolis. >> i would like to represent my district with honesty and integrity. >> delegate dwyer is facing a serious personal challenge for -- in the wake of being arrested a second time for dui. after observing him speeding and routeg erratically on 100. his car registration had also expired. police say dwyer had performed poorly on field to brady tests and refused a breathalyzer. the second arrest comes as wire the way to sentencing for driving a boat while intoxicated. his boat collided with another. several children and he himself were hurt. this is a personal matter and for that person and i hope he gets the help that he needs. >> kurtz says he has been considering running for office for many years but this period of this life feels like the time is li
. are glad you could join us. a fascinating conversation with grace lee boggs is coming up now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. tavis: at almost 98 years old grace lee boggs has been a witness to so many changes, but she has also been a participant. she has learned important lessons she is sharing with new generations through her can tame you'd work in her home cap -- continued work in her hometown of detroit. >> i feel so sorry for people not living in detroit. detroit gives a sense of civilization in a way you do not get in a city like new york. obvious what was does not work. striving forways giant, and this is how giants fall. to have youhonored on this program. i am glad you are here. >>
city. we used to think the movement was going to come from labor. the movement began to come from people. people taking charge of their neighborhoods. safety innking about terms of neighborliness rather than police. this transformation more important than from hunting to agriculture. how important do you think detroit has been to the nation culturally? of theere once a symbol miracle of production, and we were producing more faster. that we believe that was not unnatural, considering how important henry ford was, but that was not sustainable. in the second decade of the 21st century. in the second decade of the 20th century. those dreams are dead, but we are shaking the world with a new dream. tavis: what is that? food insteadr own of using trucks to bring food and using a lot of fuel. living isay of bringing the neighbor back to the hood. tavis: how did you get to detroit? >> i believed in ideas about ther and workers being secret for the future, and i learned to friendly -- to differently by being married to jimmy job -- jimmy boggs. >> tell me about him. the people in the south
and marian wright edelman. us.re glad you have joined those conversations coming up right now. ♪ by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: dr. algernon austin is the author of "the unfinished march." good to have you on this program, sir. i want to jump right in, there in-depth you have done research on to give us some sort of portrait of where we are and where we are not, 50 years later. i want to jump right in and go in this particular order. first, these ghettos of poverty. how is it, why is it that 50 years after king tried to ring this bell, poverty is still threatening our democracy? how is it that poverty is now a matter of national security? >> the thing is is that there was some policies that importantly reduced poverty. but our commitment to poverty has really waned over the 70's, 80's, and in recent years. we have allowed a number of prevent all workers firm really sharing in prosperity. for example, one of the demands of the march was for a decent minimum wage. a minimum wage that would be worth today over at $13 an hour. today
struck us most was how natural it sounded. went to see a production. it seems very stately, and when you see it done by somebody you you think, this is something i would love people to see, how fun, however vests how effervescent. a production in 12 days where you were cracking the whip? to get it on film, or were you directing it with the idea of the egg a theatrical release? it using aof theatrical release? >> i was not sure of it being a theatrical release. alexis are good friends, and when they played it 10 years ago i thought, they should play that, but it was not until i had an idea of what to do as a direct or i thought, i should do it. wanted to capture the urgency, that you are there, that it is really happening. moment,ry much in the but at the same time, i had to make a piece of cinema. everybody was working their hardest. we knew it was going to be incredibly difficult. tavis: >> does it say something to the immediacy of shakespeare's work that you could deliver in a short amount of time? >> if i could have done avengers in 12 days i would take a long vacation, and america wo
this opportunity and for encouraging, empowering, and enlightening us for the past 10 seasons. congratulations on your star at the hollywood walk of fame. you so deserve it. tavis: thank you, i appreciate that. appreciate that. all right, tell us who's coming up tonight. >> a conversation with musician booker t., coming up right now. there is a saying by dr. king that says that there's always the right time to do the right thing. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: booker t. is among the best. an accomplished musician, record producer, and songwriter, something of a child prodigy, he played the oboe, the saxophone, the trombone, the piano at school, an organ at church, and at only 17, he produced his first million-selling single, the iconic "green onions." over his long career he's worked with everybody from willie nelson to ray charles to neil young and dozens of others, and has produced dozens of his own albums, including earning individua
confirm they are investigating anthony hamilton's alleged use of someone else's academic record. identity fraud in maryland is illegal. hamilton was appointed to the city school board in june, he resigned two weeks ago. after our reporting punched holes in his claim that he had a master's degree from hopkins and was also a graduate of cop pen. a man who is a coppen grad told us he discovered what hamilton had done when he tried to get his transcript. >> they could not locate it by my name, but when i gave my social security number they were able to pull it up. but it was not my name on it, it was his name on it, under my social security number. >> anthony hamilton's name? >> yes, anthony hamilton's name was on my transcript. he used five years of my hard work at coppen, putting myself through school, and has made money. >> hamilton got a job with the city health department in 2008 that required a masters degree or a bachelors degree with certain experience, he was paid $52,000 per year. he resigned from the job last week. the state's attorneys office will not comment on its investigation.
from kelly. it does not get much more eclectic than that. we are glad you joined us. those conversations are coming up right now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. they queue. -- thank you. tavis: there is no more important profession been educating students, and no teacher has done a better job of demanding a level of excellence that has earned him a medal of honor. the book is filled with no- nonsense advice for kids who want to make -- for teachers who want to make a difference in kids lives. this year they performed the tempest with a reminder of the of for justice for all. >> get up stand up rightsor your >> you were telling me you were with the group of your kids in a hotel room when the verdict in the george zimmerman case was announced. tell me how you talk to kids about that. >> i basically try to tell them there is a difference between logic and what is presented as justice. they are not always together. that is what the students could not understand. to keep participating in this country, or he died for nothing. i think it teacher
and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their --pertise in global finance to to understand the business you operate in and help provide capital for strategic decisions. expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting live from washington. denies that the rebels hit his convoy today as enjoying ase, and newfound freedom in pakistan. a bbc story free to this young girl from forced labor and hopefully opened a world of opportunity. >> the biggest change is she can take her place in the classroom and have a chance to learn. this seemed impossible before. their photograph captured faces -- a look at the groundbreaking work of walter evans. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and across the globe. the syrian government is describing rebel claims that the motorcade was hit today. assassination the attempt happened as he was going to a mosque to celebrate the end of ramadan. video of him unharmed
are glad you could join us for our conversation with taylor branch, coming up. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: taylor branch is, of course, the brilliant writer of the trilogy "the king years." he has distilled the epic story into one book. it is called "the king years: historic moments in the civil rights movment." he joins us from washington. taylor, good to have you on the program. >> i wish i could be with you. tavis: i wish we could have you in the studio. you have spent basically your life working on this icon a trilogy, and then you end up with a book that basically distills it all down. why did you do this? >> teachers have told me for many years that while they
burnett and she is one of the countries most beloved entertainers, making us life gave her life has had more than its share of challenges and tragedies. most profoundly, the death of her daughter carrie can she has written about that in a new book called "carrie and me." enjoy conversation with carol burnett coming up right now. >> there's a saying that dr. king had, and he said, "there's always a right time to do the right thing." i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we're only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. and walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> it is a well-worn clichÉ to say that someone doesn't need an introduction. but look at this face. [laughter] does she really need an introduction? i am delighted to have children and on this program. she is a brilliant comedian whose comic antics more than 50 years have entertained us. she has also had, like
have the producers found us working in the club. we made this record. those were the ones that we were there to supervise. at the time, i can still do it. we learned how to tune the echo, equalization. we are like sponges. tavis: i am moved by the fact that such a young age, you knew what you wanted it to sound like and what it should sound like. andany people are produced, you'll learn to work the board arned to work thed t board. did was ask questions. you can really concentrate. tavis: how did you hook up? >> said there is a full set hah ontario. they say there is this visiting guy that we have before. to pick up an electric guitar and start. songs that were not very good. most amazing thing about the first song was recorded in 1962, maybe 1961. at the voice of america radio station. this fellow heard me playing the guitar at a party and i said, i have to get you on tape. i have lots of stuff. it was a real to rio. there was nothing to do. year in high school, i would have been there back in tampa. that was all that i had. that recording, my style had emerged virtually whole. i was
you joined us for our conversation with harrison ford, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: more than a decade before civil rights activists took to the streets to challenge jim crow laws, branch rickey, general manager of the then brooklyn dodgers, and played by harrison ford in the movie "42," went up against a wall of segregation and brought in jackie roosevelt robinson to integrate america's then all- white pastime. it was a courageous move by both men. robinson endured horrendous opposition, of course, from racially charged taunts to death threats, all the while triumphing on the field. rickey took on the baseball establishment, defied ow
between the u.s. and russia and another snack when president obama canceled a planned meeting with president putin in russia next month. this comes just days after russia decided to grant asylum to the former intelligence analyst, edwards noted. -- edward snowden. two towering figures on the world stage. relations between russia and washington have never been more, has hadpresident obama a major diplomatic snub aimed at president putin. edward snowden is at the center of the latest round. the former contractor fled america after leaking government secrets. the u.s. is unhappy after russia granted him asylum to stay there. president obama made his feelings clear. >> they have been times where they slip back into -- what i consistently say to them and president putin is, that is the past. we got to think about the future, and there is no reason why we should not be able to cooperate better than we do. the two men to work together when it comes to iran, north korea, and afghanistan. but relations between the two remain strained on a number of issues. over are tensions resolving t
eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> the emotional ups and downs of the crawley family, has captured the imaginations of viewers a at both here and in the uk. is mcgovern plays the american born countess of grantham, cora crawley. let's take a look at a scene from downton abbey. >> my dear. >> don't worry about me, i am american. you know what? we have a wedding to celebrate. and sure it's a great day. if it's to be our last, let's make it a wonderful last. let's enjoy art lovely home and the lovely people we spend our live with. tavis: see, that gives a whole for worse." [laughter] >> i'll say. whoa. tavis: so he's telling you that he lost all the money. all the money. >> you handed me the sandwich. tavis: yeah. he lost all the money and you're just -- you're okay with that. >> that -- yeah. [laughter] that took me a bit of distance to travel as an actress, but i got there in the end. tavis: ye
are glad you joined us. tavis: good evening. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: natalie cole was first introduced to latin music by her legendary father, nat king cole, who learned to sing in spanish in the 1950s in havana. inspired by those songs, natalie has recorded her first album in spanish, titled appropriately, "natalie cole en espanol." let's listen to a cut from the cd.♪ ♪ ♪ tavis: he still sounds so good. >> i do? tavis: you do >> oh. tavis: - but your daddy does, too. >> well of course. tavis: no, you sound good. i was getting to that. i was just starting with your daddy, saying >> oh, yes. tavis: - he still sounds so good. >> and we found footage of him singin
you joined us. a conversation with mr. pierce brosnan is coming up. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: embracing new challenges keeps artists vibrant, and that is what here's brosnan has done with his new movie. -- pierce brosnan has done with his new movie. challengesr from the he met while playing james on. "love is all you need your quote -- all you need." an orange tree for ned years before it was prud like a lemon. most of these trees are oranges. they have to be nurtured so they do not grow back as oranges. it is a time-consuming process. >> the tree can make both lemons and oranges? i like that. you know, lemons are my favorite fruit. i cannot imagine the world without them. >> n
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. -- >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. >>vis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. imagine you have just direct did marvelbased on characters and you have just agreed to make the sequel. here is joss whedon. you made it in your own th backyard in 12 days, and this is what you come up with. >> are you sure benedict loves entirely?o >> did they bid you tell her of it? >> they did not, but i persuaded them if they love benedict. >> why did you so? does not the gentleman deserves as full of bad -- a be? womanure never framed a of as proud of stuff as beatrice. >> then kingsley came through, and when he does it is through a to go conversation without shakespeare making a cameo, so i will ask you. what is it about shakespeare? language, and it is how personally i relate to it. with it even before i could understand it. i love the poetry, but the more i studied it, the more i go, this is about me. is 400kes me that it years since he wrote it,
decisions. she wanted to be part of the process, and correctly so. i think she was extraordinarily useful to chadwick boseman, who played her husband, and to brian helgeland, our director. tavis: yeah. i don't want to call him a kid, but this is obviously the movie of his career so far. what do you make of this chadwick bo? >> an extraordinary actor, a really extraordinary person. he worked from mid-january to may, five days a week, five hours a day, on perfecting the baseball skills that were necessary to play jackie robinson. he really understood the opportunity that he had and the challenge that he had, and i think he took tremendous advantage of that opportunity. he's a great kid. we're going to be seeing him a lot. tavis: yeah. i know that your career is not about living and dying by the numbers, but i did mention at the top of this show that you have made about $6 billion worldwide with the films that you've put forth. what does it say to you, if anything - back to what i referenced earlier - that this movie was number one last weekend. not just number one, harrison, but number one
halfway to eliminate hunger. wal-mart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: ethan hawke has started in "training" and "precinct 13" but whatever he accomplishes as a director or writer he will probably be remembered in part for the character of jesse who along with julie delpy is a couple who moviegoers have followed two decades first in "before sun rise" and again "before sun set" and let's take a look at a clip frp the film. >> i knew when i started this particular case that i might stumble on a few things that maybe somebody would have overlooked. >> might stumble, you in fact did uncovered some additional information that the cops overlooked. >> first, let me say there are a lot of good police officers an i do not in any way disparage what they do. but in police world doing something wrong can mean ruining somebody life. what does better seeing your movie or see your book that is now on the best seller list? >> the justice. tavis: that's
. critics career risk help revive contemporary rhythm-and-blues. we are glad you have joined us. a conversation with india are read and a performance coming up. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. yourd by contributions to pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: with her eclectic mix of musical styles that combine r&b, soul, jazz, folk, and even hip-hop, india.arie has always defied easy classification. after a four -year gap she's just released her latest cd. it's called "songversation," love that title. let's take a look at india singing a cut from the new cd, called "cocoa butter." >> ♪ ♪ ♪ tavis: we were just [laughter] -- y'all missed that. >> oh, i'm terrible. tavis: when the brother started walking at the end, india said, "he
: a memoir." we are glad you joined us. a conversation with jimmy connors coming up. >> there's a saying that dr. king had, and he said, "there's always a right time to do the right thing." i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we're only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. and walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. ♪ tavis: the aggressive take-no- prisoners style of play that defined jimmy connors as a tennis champion is now so taken for granted that it's hard to remember that this working class kid from east st. louis just about redefined how tennis was played. some might say not necessarily for the better, he broke rules, challenged line judges, argued his case. when earlier champions had been praised for their gentleman-like demeanor, connors was all about winning, and he did so with gusto, remaining in the top 10 for 16 years, five as number one, including gett
hunger. we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can snap hunger out. and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. ♪ tavis: it is impossible to overstate the success of "the big bang theory," with its completed just now sixth season. the cbs sitcom regularly draws about 20 million viewers each week, a rare feat in today's multichannel broadcast universe. anchoring the series is johnny galecki. >> hello, sir. tavis: i like saying that -- johnny galecki. >> i like how you say it. tavis: johnny galecki. >> music to my ears. [laughter] tavis: who plays a brilliant but nevertheless sensible physicist, providing an excellent foil to jim parsons' brilliant but clueless sheldon cooper. later this year, johnny galecki [laughter] will be seen in the independent film "cbgb." say that fast three times. let's take a look at a scene, though, from "the big bang theory." >> ok, glasses off. find waldo. [applause] [laughter] hurry up. find him. >> i'm trying. don't you let me. >> he's wearing a hat, gl
. you could make more money than all of us." at first i was kind of scared, and then i got involved and i seen that it was easy money, so i continued to do it. then i ended up losing my job and i ended up losing my way, because when you're doing right, you've got to do all the way right. when you're doing wrong, you've got to do all the way wrong. ain't no half-ways. so when i jumped in, i jumped all the way in, and that's when i went down the wrong path and had to find myself sooner or later. tavis: were you ever, in those years, concerned about, frightened about, how long you would live? i ask that because there's so many young people today, fans of your music, obviously, who live in a world, live in a culture, live in inner cities, where they don't even expect to live to be your age or my age. >> i didn't think i would be 21, and that's real, because of what was going on around me and the way i lived and the way the people lived around me. twenty-one was a blessing. if you made it to see 21, you were looked at as an og in my neighborhood, because you made it. so once i finally ma
-- this happened around 10 p.m. monday night. neighbors tell us they witnessed the victim run down the street as he tried to get to a house to get some help. startled, cynthia brown was not sure what was happening. >> we were sitting in the living room last night and we heard shots. was -- ran past year. rex the initial investigation hasn't dated the suspect and the victim were in some sort of altercation when they were in the 100 block of winters lane. weaponpect produced a and began firing at the him striking him at least once. he fled the scene. >> the victim was hit in the upper body. investigators say his injury is not considered i threatening. police are investigating the weekend shootings of two men in the 5300 block of edmonton avenue. both were standing in front of this gas station when another man opened fire and ran from the area. the injuries were not life- threatening and they have no indication the incidents are connected. >> i was shocked. >> there worried. they moved into the neighborhood to be closer to her son's school . >> i do not want him to see anything like that happen ever.
billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: there is an old adage that says that who you were isn't who you have to be, and that certainly applies to snoop lion. one of the most celebrated rap musicians of all time he came on the scene at the height of gangsta rap back in the early '90s. sixteen grammy nominations quickly followed, but the death of some of his closest friends make snoop lion rethink his life, and a journey to jamaica to record reggae with some of the finest musicians in that field, well, that did the rest. it's all chronicled in a spectacular new documentary due out march 15th. it's called "reincarnated," about the making of that cd. and so, before we start our conversation with snoop lion, we'll take a look at a clip from the documentary.♪ >> snoop is still in jamaica, participating in authentic jamaican culture. ♪ been on the top ever since i have been in it. i have got a rap soul that will never die, but it is no disres
rehearse the unknown? say, when, he used to you practice something, you will go on stage and do variations of what you practiced. it's no surprise. the unknown, the unexpected is a reflection for me musically of what is happening in the world today. people are learning how to dialogue with each other without any past strategy or any kind of formula. tavis: for young person watching this, you are not suggesting that they don't have to spend time getting in the practice to become a wayne shorter when they. you can do this now. you could have done this 80 years ago. chris geyer foundation together. practice a lot of -- >> get your foundation together. practice a lot of skills and things like that. one student said to charlie parker, i have to learn all of these keys and scales/ -- and scales? and charlie parker said, yes. then forget it. tavis: [laughter] are you still learning new stuff? >> i am still learning. i am learning more about life when i'm playing, too. and writing music. i'm learning more about life, the connections. what we are doing is not disconnected from our human behavior. s
television appearance with us tonight. they'll be at the outside lands music festival in san francisco on august 11th. their debut album, "kids raising kids," is getting just terrific reviews. please welcome kopecky family band. [ cheers and applause ] ♪ ♪ and i don't know no i don't know what i can do for you ♪ ♪ you make my heartbeat beat i beat like a drum for you ♪ ♪ every day it's closer don't take it back no no sir ♪ ♪ i'll play my favorite part for you ♪ ♪ i'm in a strange position come on and join where i am in ♪ ♪ i'll keep the door wide open for you ♪ ♪ and i don't know no i don't know what i can do for you ♪ ♪ you make my heartbeat beat i beat like a drum for you ♪ ♪ this is the part we both love we cov our skin 'cause it's so cold ♪ ♪ how did i find myself here with you ♪ ♪ granted you play your cards right baby i swear i won't fight ♪ ♪ i like this game we're playing do you ♪ ♪ and i don't know no i don't know what i can do for you ♪ ♪ you make my heartbeat beat i beat like a drum for you ♪ ♪ and i don't know no i
've seen -- no, i like -- i used to like, "mob wives." >> jay: "mob wives." >> big ang. [ in new york accent ] "came over to my place. it was fantastic." [ laughter and applause ] >> jay: that's good. >> yeah. [ applause ] >> jay: now, what is it you like about "mob wives"? is it an american thing? >> it's america isn't it? nothing -- there's nothing like this place. i remember going to las vegas, and somebody said, "what's it like in vegas?" i said there's no place like vegas. only america could produce that. only america could produce "mob wives" or ""american idol." >> jay: it's always funny to me, when friends come from england and we go somewhere to get something to eat and they order a coke or soda and -- you can bathe in that in england. it's enormous. [ laughter ] >> everything is so small in england. [ muttering ] [ laughter ] >> jay: yeah. i mean, i was in a pub once in england and ordered a turkey sandwich. i got two pieces of bread with one slice of turkey. and i thought, this is a joke. [ in english accent ] turkey -- you want a turkey sandwich. one slice of turkey! >> i
. >> right. we're glad you joined us. a conversation with eva mendes, coming up right now. tavis: eva mendes's breakthrough >> as we opposite denzel work together, we can stamp hunger out. to youry contributions pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: eva mendes's breakthrough role was opposite denzel washington in "training day." she has since gone on to make her mark costarring with an array of actors, from johnny depp to matt damon. she's now costarring with ryan gosling and bradley cooper in an emotionally charged movie called "the place beyond the pines," about fathers, sons, and the consequences of the decisions they make. eva plays a single mom trying the best way she can to navigate a life that didn't exactly turn out the way she'd hoped. let's take a look at a clip from the movie. [clip] tavis: i almost didn't recognize you; you're all glammed up today. >> (laughter) >> you do whatever you need to do. >> what are you going to do? wax i am going to do what i have to do. going to go to school. i am going to take care of jason. i work here. that is what i am doing. that is
. she's about to turn 30. >> jay: now, see, i love that. katy perry was here the other night. she used this term "quarter life crisis." this is hysterical. >> the kids and their terms these days, yeah. >> jay: oh, a tenth of a life crisis. i'm nine. [ light laughter ] i mean, i've never even heard of that. >> people panic at any age. and you want a label it, i think. but, you know, my character is about to turn 30, and her life isn't as she expected it to be. so she decides to move back home and create the circumstances that she was last happiest in, which was when she was a lifeguard in high school. and then she starts to hang out with some 16-year-olds, and it's not appropriate. >> jay: oh. [ light laughter ] oh. yeah. >> it's not, guys. it's not appropriate. >> jay: suddenly guys are going, "oh, i want to see this." >> yeah, it's a great -- [ light laughter ] she has a dangerous relationship. >> jay: now, is that difficult for you? working with young, handsome co-stars? >> oh. no. i was nervous because there are some intimate scenes. but thankfully, he was not 16. he was 19. but the
speaking on behalf of a family of a young man from gadahn. he came to the u.s. to further raise education, but was brutally murdered. the man who committed the crime is now committed to psychiatric hospital. >> there is conceivably a time found able to be released back into society. i don't think it will be any time soon, but that is always one of the concerns with a disposition like this. >> he admitted to attacking the man with an axe while he was sleeping, dismembered the body, and he is hard. and he ate his heart. police located the remaining body parts inside a dumpster in the church parking lot. the prosecutor is not only disturbed by the crime, but also what happened before and after the murder. planning that went into the commission and the planning that went into disposal of the evidence and the cleaning up, aside from what you all heard about the disposal of the body parts in the dumpster, and the room had been painted. >> a family friend of the victim told a judge he was a got the young man with a strong family background. -- was a godly young man with a strong family backgroun
. >> the couch is used for many purposes, isn't it? should i lie down? >> jay: now, i want to hear. that touch is what did it? >> how many -- what's your viewership here? >> jay: millions. >> millions, okay. well in that case. what was the question? [ laughter ] >> jay: the question was -- you got that hug going and then it took off from there? >> it did. yes, it did, jay. >> jay: how long after that initial ntact -- >> did we take our clothes off? how graphic do i need to get here? [ light laughter ] >> jay: permission to treat as a hostile witness, your honor. >> but it was very quick. so we didn't tell people immediately. >> jay: okay, but arrogant and aloof. i like that. >> yeah. >> jay: let's take a break. more with cate when we come back. [ cheers and applause ] ♪ how do you do a summer clearance event the dodge way? first wait till summer. then get the cars ready. now add the dodge part. ♪ the dodge summer clearance event. right now get 0% financing for up to 72 months and no payments for 90 days on all dodge vehicles. we've just topped our quarter pounder with even more bold new ta
. [ audience oohs ] oh, yeah, but you use your iphone, don't you, you bunch of hypocrites. don't give me that. oh, that's so wrong. you know, 911 operators have heard it all. but this one, here, take a a listen. >> may i have the address of your emergency? >> this is not an emergency, but like i was wondering like when -- this is kind of embarrassing, but i got my penis stuck in an amplifier, the hole, is there any solution, i can get for -- or any advice you can give me by taking my penis out of the amplifier? >> take what out of your what? >> my penis out of an amplifier? >> out of an amplifier? no, i don't. i can send somebody there to help you. >> no, i don't really want help. this is really embarrassing. >> so, what is your address? [ dial tone ] [ laughter ] >> jay: we'll be right back with kristin chenoweth right after this. [ cheers and applause ] ♪ didn't phone it in. we started at the beginning. we did our homework. we focus grouped. and we focus grouped the focus groups. then we brought in all the carriers and all the phones, and we decided when you stop loving this, you should b
!. ♪. ♪. >>> este segmento de "despierta amÉrica" es presentado por us diez, envÍa y recibe alegria con facilidad, con la ayuda de us diez. >>> ay vulgarcita quÉ bonita eres, chocala mi querida ana. >>> te crees mucho porque te vas a a casar. >>> encontrÉ un hombre bien lindo manita. >>> estÁ medio feo, pero esta bien. >>> oiga, se parece a usted. (risas) >>> mejor vamos a contar chistes. contravsÍ, chistes. >>> para que aprenda ahora que se va a casar, para que despotrique contra los hombres, por quÉ un hombre no puede ser guapo e inteligente a la vez? >>> ¿por quÉ?>>> porque serÍa mujer. (risas) >>> montoneros, por quÉ la mayorÍa de las mujeres maneja mal? >>> no sÉ. >>> ¿por quÉ?>>> porque los instructores de manejo son hombres. (risas) o sea es su culpa. ♪. ♪. ♪. ♪. >>> ay vulgarcita. >>> sÍ. >>> a ver. bola de montoneros, escuchen, en quÉ se parecen los hombres a las computadoras? >>> en en quÉ? >>> en que tienen memoria, pero cerebro no. >>> en quÉ se parece un hombre a un telÉfono pÚblico? >>> en quÉ? >>> en que de mil solo sirve uno y siempre estÁ ocupado, (ri
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